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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  October 19, 2015 7:00am-9:00am EDT

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♪ an arab israeli man is dead this morning after being shot and killed by israeli forces with an attack at a bus station, the continued violence in the middle east has secretary john carry calling for calm. >> we also share a global interest in seeing the region find a way forward. >> reporter: clamping down on drones after a string of dangerous incidents, the federal government considers new rules to try to reign in rogue users. getting an early taste of winter this morning as temperatures drop and snowfalls from the midwest to the northeast. ♪
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secretary of state john kerry is calling on israel and the palestinians to end that violence. the violence left nine israelis and 43 palestinians dead. overnight he urged both sides to clarify stance on the disputed mosque compound. over the next several days kerry says he will meet with prime minister benjamin netanyahu and palestinian leader and good morning and welcome for your world i'm del. >> and i'm stephanie and israel police are opening an investigation into the death of an eritrean asylum seeker they mistakenly shot and thought he was involved in a shooting at the bus station and the shooter was killed with a soldier and we are live this morning in jerusalem and carl tell us more about what happened in barsheeba and what the reaction has been among israelis this morning.
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>> reporter: well stephanie when you look at the video surveillance footage you see what a confusing situation that was, what police tell us was that an israeli palestinian burst into the central bus station, seized the rifle from an israeli soldier there and began to spray the concourse with bullets. now police say that nine people were wounded, four police officers, the others civilians and one israeli soldier was killed. the attacker was also shot but what caused problem is that an another man an atray yanukovich asylum seeker 26 years old targeted by a security guard and suspected him of being a second attacker and he was wounded and when he went down on the ground he was surrounded by civilians and persuaded to kick and beat him with a bench and later died in hospital and that is why police are urging civilians not to take matters in their own hands and trying to find the civilians responsible for the
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killing and right now you understand there is a lot of pa paranoia and comes against the back drop of possible talks this week between u.s. secretary of state john kerry and israeli and palestinian officials. let's take a look at this report and see what expectations for this week may be. mayhem caught on camera, moments after a gunman opened fire at a bus station in southern israel. the attack came as the u.s. secretary of state john kerry prepares to meet with israeli officials in an effort to help restore calm. >> later this week i will week with prime minister netanyahu because he will be in germany and i'm coming through at that moment, we will meet there. >> reporter: kerry also plans to discuss the latest surge of violence with palestinian president abas yet some senior palestinian leaders clearly
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believe the u.s., israel's staunchest is not honest. >> you cannot talk about the two parties with asymmetry and have to be in compliance with law and humanitarian law and with the requirements of peace but to do business as usual can be extremely dangerous and counter productive. >> reporter: israeli officials disagree. given the war in syria and the growing influence of iran they say the u.s. has a vested interest in helping avoid another mid east flash point. >> obviously the state department and the white house would like to see this area much more stable and i think together israel and the u.s. can stabilize this area so, yes, the answer is yes i do think the u.s. has a lot to put into this situation to lower the flames and calm things down. >> reporter: violence escalated since mid september,
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palestinians fear the israeli government want to grant jews greater rights to visit and even pray at the mosque compound. it's one of the holiest sites for both religions. so while the issue of rights and restrictions to that site over there may be the immediate cause of the current round of violence it's just as much a symbolic trigger, a trigger that is fueling old fears and stoking a distrust that has been going on for so many generations is almost genetic and sunday prime minister benjamin netanyahu said he is not willing to change the political arrangement which jews call temple. >> it has not changed in the years but what has changed is hoodlums paid by the islam movement and by hamas and entering the mosque and from there emerge and attack jewish
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to the temple mount and christian visitors. >> i think the unfortunate thing in these talks if they do take place this week is what is going to come out of them because on one hand the palestinian leadership were telling me yesterday they don't believe they can stop the violence going on right now given the random nature and the younger generations no longer respect the senior leadership and difficult to see if the palestinian leadership can reign in this wave of violence and on the other hand of course those type of attack we saw last night are really only going to steal the resolve of the israeli government, i'm not sure either side is in any mood to talk stephanie. >> carl with the prospective from jerusalem and thank you. stay with us, in 15 minutes we will get the perspective on tensions in israel from gaza, a palestinian journalist and human rights researcher will join us then. secretary of state john kerry saying he will meet
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separately with israel and palestinian leaders this week and talking in spain kerry says finding a solution to the crisis is critical. >> and obviously the united states remains deeply concerned about and engaged in efforts to help israel with respect to its security. but we also share a global interest in seeing the region find a way forward to avoid this kind of confrontation and senseless loss of life. >> reporter: as you heard carl say the latest tensions there sparked over fears that israel would restrict access to the compound that contains the mosque, kerry says he does not expect any changes in the status quo at the holy site. u.s. and european officials taking steps this morning to remove sanctions against iran now the nuclear deal has taken effect, this weekend iran pledging to begin to make major changes to its facilities and cooperated with u.n. inspectors, the sanctions will not be
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limited until iran fully complies and we have more on what iran next do to keep up its end of the bargain. >> reporter: it took years of conflict and negotiations with a group of p 5 plus one to put together a deal the obama administration says it will be based on verification and not trust. the landmark nuclear agreement saysy ly curtail its nuclear program, a move experts say will significantly reduce its capability of developing nuclear weapons. in july when the agreement was reached the u.s. secretary of state john kerry said it is a deal worth fighting for. >> a step away from the specific spector of conflict and to the possibility of peace. >> reporter: began the biggest nuclear dismantlement in history and has the mothballing of centrifuge and shipping fuel out of the country and iran authorities say will be done by
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the end of november and iran is key with the crippling economic sanctions are eased and still has plenty of vocal critics. >> this deal doesn't make peace more likely but fueling iran's aggressions with billions of dollars in sanctions relief, it makes war more likely. >> reporter: the next few weeks as iran implements an agreement that is deeply unpopular there may,000 be the most difficult, intrusive inspections but the international atomic energy agency is key and critics warn of potential of cheating and disagreements. >> it does not fully resolve the wide range of issues where we have a big difference and so we are going to have to continue to put pressure on them through the international community. >> reporter: resent footage on iran state television that appears to show under ground tunnels packed with missiles and launchers have not helped ease concerns and the pictures were released days after iran tested
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a new long range missile and says may have breached a u.n. security resolution. for the powers involved in this agreement there is a lot at stake and especially true for barack obama and managed to broker a deal that few ever would have thought possible, in the next few weeks may shape his foreign policy legacy more than anything else, andy with al jazeera, washington. a hearing today could restart the military trial for five guantanamo prisoners accused of plotting and helping carry out 9/11 and stopped the proceedings last spring when a defense attorney revealed the f.b.i. questioned his team about a potential security breach and justice department now says no one from that legal team will face criminal charges. the pentagon says a commander killed in syria and was a saudi citizen and killed in a u.s. air strike in northwest syria and once was a top financial advisor and a leader of a group working in syria. michigan says this morning
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it wants to take in more sierran refugees as part of the president's plan to welcome 10,000 of those refugees to the up coming year and the state is home to a large middle eastern population, so far this year michigan accepted dozens of syrian refugees and more than 600 migraines arriving on the shores of italy this morning, all of them rescued from the mediterranean sea, italian navy saying most were from sub sahara and africa and hundreds were rescued from boats, at least eight bodies were found as well, activists saying at least 3100 people have died in the crossing this year. croatia crowds are struggling to cross the border this morning as police try to block their entry, more than 6,000 people reached croatia over the weekend, officials say refugee camps are over crowded and can't take in more people. hungary sealed its border with croatia on midnight on friday and forced many to travel to europe by way of slovania and
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limited it to 2500 arrivals per day and the country will take in as many people as can exit into austria. cleanup in the philippines after typhoon koppu passed through damaging homes and infrastructure and 60,000 people there forced to leave their homes and al jazeera is in the northern philippines this morning with the very latest. >> we are in the province northern philippines. the typhoon koppu struck philippines early sunday morning, this has been inaccessible. this is the area we were trying to cross to get to auror province yesterday and were unable to because of chest-deep waters and now power is still out here, still no electricity and still no running water. everything is at a stand still at the moment. you can see rice farms that have been turned into swamps, this is
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the rice capitol of the country. the impact of the typhoon is still unknown. so many areas like this one where there have been just basically cutoff from the rest of the world. we are trying to get to another area now further north called auora providence and their communication has been difficult since the resources are stretched at the moment and very hard to quantify the damage because right now the biggest problem is infrastructure. >> that is reporting this morning from the philippines. millions are waking up to frigid temperatures after a cold weekend and snow is generally supposed to arrive after the leaves have dropped and not so in upper michigan, winter came early to the northern part of the state where some places recorded more than 5" of snow this weekend. and the same story in western new york state where snow dropped on flowers still in bloom. some areas got up words of 6" of snow and accidents across the
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region from icy roads and bridges. here is the thing that is so scary there is frost and freeze warnings up for a huge part of country. >> let's bring in metrologist nickel mitchell and welcome back. >> i was looking at the fall leaves and where i was and saw some snow traveling through vermont this past weekend and so cold all the way into georgia, alabama, mississippi, we have a frost advisory and the darker colors are the freeze and will go through the winter once we had the freeze it's over and that is why there is patch work, some higher mountains have already had that but these are some of the coldest temperatures of the season for many parts of the country. all the way up through the north i see northern parts of new york in the teens only this morning. a lot of 20s and 30s down the coastline. and even as far south i saw a couple temperatures below freezing in northern alabama this morning and it has been a frigid one and will recover quickly and a day or two more of complaining that i have heard.
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temperatures in in 50s for dilley dell -- philadelphia and cool air in the south midwest has the ridge of high pressure, warm air so very warm but that is actually leading so some fire dangers with low humidity and heat and quite the contrast. >> did nicole meant me when she said lots of complaining this morning? >> i thought so. >> she didn't name me, transportation department with a push to regulate drones of a report of more than $4 million industry. >> dangerous incidents in the resent months and we have more, good morning. >> federal aviation administration says it gets 100 reports every month from pilots with drone sightings and would require everyone who buys a drone to register it so the government knows who is flying
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them and where. >> reporter: a government task force is expected to start meeting within weeks to draw up rules requiring every new drone to be registered with the government, that is in response to a booming drone market and some dangerous encounters and two planes at jfk airport came within 100 feet of a drone. earlier this year a drone similar to this model about two feet in diameter went down on the grounds of the white house. >> it does serve as a very powerful reminder right on the white house doorstep that drones can be used in ways that can profoundly affect our national security as well. >> reporter: the devices are sophisticated with gps and computers and increasingly important in some industry. >> used by business and agriculture and farmers use them to see if their cows escape the ranch. >> reporter: can be equipped with cameras to weapons, last month new york senator required
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every drone to have a geo fencing, coding in the device software to limit where the drones can fly. >> geo fencing would not allow the drone to fly within two miles of an airport, about 500 feet over f.b.i. headquarters or over a parade and that would solve the problem. >> reporter: 45 states are considering their own drone regulation bills and estimated 400,000 are in the air and thousands more sold this christmas and regulations could be in place by the end of the year. >> begs the question what happens if i already own a drone? >> one source tells al jazeera that that will be one of the things that the task force will have to decide and right now it's unclear for those people who already own those. >> okay, thank you. >> thank you. university of mississippi this morning expected to vote on whether to reremove the state flag from their campus and will do that tomorrow. mississippi flag has a confederate symbol on it and
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students and faculty calling on administrators to take it down and supporters showing up on friday and other state universities don't fly that same flag. clashes over a republican legacy. >> donald trump will not back down and placing blame for 9/11 on the shoulders of george w bush. a heart stopping dive for a biker who took a plunge face first off a cliff. >> ow.
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that is a look at your world this morning in this case it is the manhattan skye line as seen from the brooklyn bridge to the right of your screen on a beautiful what is supposed to be
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a fall day but feels more like winter in the air. top stories and secretary out state john kerry is urging an end to the violence that killed at least nine israelis and 43 palestinians and speaking from spain a few hours ago he urged both to clarify the stance on the compound, a holy site for muslims and jews and announced plans to meet with palestinian president and benjamin netanyahu. and a palestinian journalist researcher based in gaza and joins us via skype this morning and good morning and thank you for your time. what is the view from gaza on events happening in israel and the west bank? >> for the first time gaza is not a part of the clashes happening between israelis and palestinians this time. why? because the clash now is like more popular for away from factions and when it comes to gaza the confrontation here is
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rockets and only rockets so the guys who go all like on a daily basis to the fence to throw stones at the soldiers they do nothing. israelis shoot them on the spot and not making my change and the real clash is in the west bank where there is a direct connect between palestinians and israelis at the checkpoints and the streets in jerusalem for example so it's kind of different this time. >> but what about hamas' role in isolated attacks on israeli citizens and called for a day of rage last week, how much does that call to palestinians inciting attacks? >> called for a day of rage but only for people to go and make demonstrations and that said but declare senior hamas leader said it's clear we are not planning to be a part of the clash and not planning to fire rockets from gaza because this would end
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the west bank and jerusalem and we don't want to end it and don't want to put attention on gaza again so it would stay and like support people in the west bank and jerusalem but we are not planning to be a direct part of the clash this time and i believe this is so logic because people in gaza have not recovered from the very offensive attack they had last summer. most say the houses are demolished and not ready for a clash and like this time is for the west bank, this time is for the popular movement and if it's not supported by factions and even if it's like from individuals doing stabbing attacks without any support from any faction. >> and that is interesting what you are reporting. you are saying hamas is purposefully taking a back seat knowing if it begins firing rockets into israel the israelis
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will have an excuse to crack down on the entire movement. let me ask you this, hamas plunging approval ratings in the west bank, is it an opportunity? >> well, can you say again please? >> does hamas view abas approval ratings and falling approval ratings in the west bank as an opportunity? >> this is exactly right. hamas sees these like activities in the west bank in jerusalem for the best policy and coordination with israelis so it's not like we are going directly against abas but look people in the west bank are not satisfied with coordination with israelis and attacking israelis on a daily basis and young generation which was raised up after the courts even and not aware of what is going on and not supporting abas but doing like this opposition and in a
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practical way and i believe that hamas is with it because it's abas popularity in the west bank. >> with the view from gaza, thank you. stephanie china's economy showing weakness and the economic growth is in a six-year low and the second largest economy growing 6.9% last quarter and the slowest growth since 2009 and that is even down from 7% the previous quarter. asia economic economist saying the chinese slump will affect the rest of the world. >> reporter: given what we have been seeing in the slow down in real estate sector in terms of the heavy industry and what it is showing is the economy is slowing but not slowing as dramatically as what some people may be thinking. we have sort of if you like a two-speed economy going. in terms of the rest of the world the fact we see the real
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estate slow and mining, and heavy slowing this is bad news for the rest of the world. >> and others saying last quarter slow down would have been worse if not for a rise in consumer spending in the summer. afghanistan economy suffering after a double blow and international aid reduced now most foreign troops are withdrawn and kunduz is another setback as jennifer glasse reports from kabul. >> reporter: the streets of kunduz city are full of cars again and it will be a long time before life gets back to normal. shop keepers are still working out their losses, many stores were destroyed in the fighting. >> translator: we've lost about 20,000 in the shop without counting the cost of destruction of the building. we want the government to guaranty security for people's lives and investment so people can come back and invest and live their lives. >> reporter: but the people of
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kunduz don't have a lot of faith in the so called national unity government and president ghani and executive abdullah abdullah and two rivals ruling together. >> translator: the situation is good now but we don't trust these two presidents or the chief executive. we are afraid if we borrow money and invest we don't trust that the fighting won't happen again. >> reporter: and that means some shops remain closed. many were looted in the fighting. they are struggling to open without enough supplies. >> translator: investment is totally gone from kunduz and before we could borrow 5,000 and now they won't give you 200 and it's all because of fighting. >> reporter: the city's biggest hotel has not had a reservation since the fighting stop and women wait for handouts a new ritual here and many don't have money for food. the fall of kunduz are being felt in kabul as well, this is
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the biggest appliance market and business is way down, this washing machine is worth 650 and it's on sale for 200 but there are no buyers. mohamed says his business has dropped by 80%. he says people who have money want to save it in case security gets worse and they are buying only what they need, no luxuries, so he is not buying much either. >> translator: the fighting in kunduz sent a message to shop keepers do not invest in our shops because the fighting is in kunduz and tomorrow it could be in kabul. >> reporter: shop keepers say they are not making enough to cover rents and worried about crime too and thieves took a safe from one business containing a few thousand dollars and all their bookkeeping documents and amen said his business lost about $10,000 in the past seven months and if the economy doesn't get better he will consider leaving afghanistan altogether, jennifer glasse, kabul. >> fascinating perspective, when
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we come back we will talk about family reunionens on the korean peninsula. >> after decades separated by politics. and vowing in canada and how muslim women have been a key issue in that race.
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>> puerto rico's debt crisis. >> they're gonna demonstrate right outside where the governor lives. >> are hedge funds offering a fix? >> those investments will spark the economic recovery. >> or just fixing the odds? >> they're trying to force us into one course of action. >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series.
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>> welcome back to your world this morning. taking a look at today's top stories. secretary of state john kerry is returning to washington today to prepare for meetings with the leaders of israel and the palestinian authority. speaking from spain, he called on both sides to clarify their stance on the he will raqqa compound, a holy site for muslims and jews to try to ease tensions. at least nine israelis and 43 palestinians have now been killed in clashes there. >> thousands of refugees stuck trying to cross into croatia. police say the refugees are being denied entry into neighboring slovenia traveling to austria. slovenia said it reached its limit of 2500 migrants a day. >> the transport is a department is expected to announce a new push to regulate drones. it would require everyone who buys a drone to register it with the government. a task force will work on the new rules in coming weeks.
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the devices have also been involved in several dangerous incidents in recent months. >> national security is the big topic this week on the presidential campaign trail. hillary clinton is making her way to capitol hill to face the house committee investigating the benghazi attacks. >> donald trump and jeb bush trading jabs over national security. trump took aim at jeb's brother, the former president, george w. bush over the september 11 attacks and jeb bush is firing back. we have more. >> on thursday, former secretary of state and democratic front runner hillary clinton testifies before the house select committee on benghazi, almost a year and a half after the committee came into existence. as it turns towards thursday's main event, republicans playing defense against accusations that the investigation is nothing more than a political witchhunt. >> she's an important wide receivers, but she is one
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witness, and by the time we're through, john, we will have interviewed 70 witnesses, so she's one of out of the 70. >> democrats, including the committee's top democratic, say the real mission isn't digging up the truth, it's really about damming hillary clinton. >> we literally a year ago had a plan that mr. gaudy presented to us where we would have interviewed these key people. he through that away and went straight after hillary clinton. >> clinton herself cited comments by kevin mccarthy that the committee had chipped away at her standing in the polls. >> i think it's pretty clear that whatever they might have thought they were doing, they ended up becoming a partisan arm of the republican national committee with an overwhelming focus on trying to, as they admitted, drive down my poll numbers. >> the benghazi inquiry
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eventually led to revelations about clinton's private email system, something even rival bernie sanders says should be put to rest. sanders said he had no second thoughts about the comment and quickly changed the subject. the american people want that the discussion in this country of the real issues. >> meanwhile, gop front runner donald trump defended his commits about president george w. bush and 9/11, questioning jeb bush's credibility and saying that because he's tough on immigration, 9/11 wouldn't have happened on a president trump's watch. >> jeb said we were safe with my brother, we were safe. well, the world trade center just fell down. i believe that if i were running things, i doubt that those people would have been in the country. >> for his part, jeb bush couldn't resist firing back. >> it just calls into question mr. trump's credibility as a commander-in-chief and architect of the next generation foreign
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policy. >> ben carson stumbled over a question about foreign policy, offering a confusing explanation of how if the u.s. had declared energy independence, there wouldn't have been a war in afghanistan. >> i personally don't believe that invading iraq was an existential threat to us. i don't think sadaam hussein was an existential threat. >> i wasn't asking about invading iraq, i was asking about invading afghanistan, which had been harbor be osama bin laden. >> i was primarily talking about iraq. i wasn't particularly interested in going into afghanistan. >> paul beban, al jazeera, new york. >> bill snyder is al jazeera americas political contributor and joins us. good morning. >> good morning. >> trump saying his policy would have stopped the september 11 terrorist attacks. george w. bush is a two term
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republican president and set the stage for us. was that a good move on donald trump's part? >> no. what's happening is he's losing whatever little bit of credibility he has left. i mean, this is really insulting to republicans. what they're looking for is someone who can stand up to trump's bullying. the problem right now is jeb bush doesn't look quite tough enough in standing up to trump. he looks like he's being pushed around. >> he says that he has, jeb, says he has great concerns about donald trump having the nuclear codes. is that standing up to donald trump in your opinion. >> not quite enough. he's expressing concerns, but he's got to really say it like it is for many republicans, donald trump is not a real conservative on a lot of issues. he doesn't believe what a lot of members of the party believe and he's saying ridiculous things. how can he be sure that these terrorists would not have been admit to the country before 9/11? how can he blame george bush,
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the brother who was president for 9/11, he'd been in office only a few months. i think republicans are not--just don't like this. republicans are looking for someone who can stand up to the bully and right now, jeb bush doesn't look like the guy who can do that. >> the problem with the republican argument is that donald trump continues to lead in the polls. some say that that lead may be mathematically impossible dew break. can a donald trump as the republican standard bearer win in a general election? >> that would be very difficult. the question is also can he win the primary, can he get the republican nomination. he could do that. i think it's not likely, but it's possible. i call it a hostile takeover of the republican party. his people would just flood the primaries and the caucuses. they're mostly not regular republican voters. there is a chance he could take the republican nomination. your question was about can he be elected president. i think that's very unlikely, because he says too many
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provocative things. he's too dangerous. he's too risky and all these statements he is making, attacking president bush, for example, they show people that he's really not ready to be president. >> i want to switch gears to benghazi. there's an argument put forth that says trump is right, saying that if hillary clinton is to blame for benghazi, then george w. bush bears the blame for september 11. >> i've heard that argument. i don't think either argument makes sense. hillary clinton might be blamed for not dealing with benghazi quickly enough, not responding to the alerts that she got, and you can make an argument that george w. bush got some signals that there was an imminent attack. there were congressional hearings about it. that's not what trump is saying. trump is saying simply it happened on his watch, therefore he's to blame, just like benghazi happened on hillary's watch, therefore she is to blame. it's not a sophisticated
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argument, it's trying to pin something on someone else. it sounds like a bullying procedure that trump is doing. republicans are looking for someone who can stand up to the bully. >> on the benghazi situation, those committee hearings that are taking place this week, do those hearings still have the luster that they had six months ago? >> no, they don't, because they've been exposed, this motivated at least in some part perhaps in large part by politics, of attempts to destroy hillary clinton. they look like what your correspondent said, a witchhunt. if on thursday, when she testifies, it looks like a witchhunt to viewers on television and is report that had way, i think there will be a wave of sympathy for hillary clinton. she's not completely free of this issue, particularly the email issue. the biggest threat to her campaign right now is not the benghazi committee, it's the f.b.i., whether they'll bring any kind of charges against her for security violations. that is the big threat she faces. >> bill snyder for us in
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washington, d.c., thank you very much. >> a federal judge expected to decide today if louisiana's governor can stop medicate funding for plant parent had. the governor has been trying to end that funding for the women's group for months. it is connected to the secretly recorded video showing workers talking about handling feet tall tissue. without court money, planned parenthood willent next week. >> the first voters in canada cast their ballots 40 minutes ago. prime minister stephan harper is running for a rare fourth term and challenged by tomas mulcar and justin trudpau. >> a gather last week, some canadians getting together for a panel discussion about the piece
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of clothing that covers muslim women around the world. the meeting is in response to what some consider anti muslim rhetoric. >> we have the same beliefs, the same fears, the same happy insists, we are all the same. >> they are concerned about the push to have muslim uncover their faces if they want to be sworn issue as canadian citizens. >> why would canadians embrace a practice that is not transparent, that is not open, and frankly is rooted in can a cult u. that is anti women. >> muslim leaders say such rhetoric has led to three attacks on women wearing the garment since the comments were made. the number of religious based violent attacks doubled in 2014. there are even more already this year. >> i met up with ahia near her
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home. she was willing to show her face privately to the judge before swearing her oath publicly with everyone else. she said wearing the garment that never been an issue until now. >> the canadian community is very polite, but still i have noticed that they do look a little bit more strangely towards me. >> prime minister stephan harper called the wearing of the garment uncanadians what do you say for that? >> i've been wearing it for a long time, though i didn't always wear it. i feel very liberate and feel it's not necessary for me to show my face to communicate. >> the policy was ruled as a violation of their right. >> that policy is not law, yet the minister purported to create a policy that trumped the law or in effect attempted to rule by decree. >> senior are a daniel is not comfortable anymore in her home country. she arrived in glasgow as a baby
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and said she has never been more afraid to wear a hijab in public. >> tomorrow, it might be my hijab or something else. i kind of jokingly said well one day, maybe we'll all have to come in our birthday suit. >> the bump in polls harper got after the comment dissipated, but canadians have called him out on it. >> our prime minister, despite his attempts to make it a wedge issue has failed to do so. canadians are not racist people. canadians know better. they have a greater expectation of their government. >> he is talking about banning the garment for public employees. john terrett, al jazeera,
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toronto. >> excitement and anxiety in the koreas this morning as hundreds on both sides of the border prepare to meet relatives they have not seen in nearly 65 years. 400 south koreans are expected to cross into north korea for family reunions. the event is part of an effort to try to reduce tensions. it is only the second such reunion in five years. >> this is the hotel lobby where the 400 family members have been contacted by the north korean side that their relatives had been seeking this reunion have been registering for that reunion. it's been a room full of incredible individual stories, personalized changed forever by the huge impersonal forces of history. among those stories, i'll share one of them with you, the story of 84-year-old married for seven months. she was three months pregnant when her husband went missing.
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he was part of the south korean military. he went off on military training but in the confusion of the war never came home. she schooled sha he died, paid tribute to him everier. >>, since she looked after his parents, raised the son who was still unborn at the time of his disappearance. she's kept with her all that time a pair of his old shoes, saying essentially that her whole life was contained in those shoes, the absence of that man. she's brought with her her now 64-year-old son. he's talking about being able to embrace both of his parents for the first time, the sense of pride that he had finally finding out that he had a father. when you hear an old man talking in those sorts of terms of almost a young boy, you get the sense of the emotional power that's around this place at the moment. it all gets way on tuesday when they travel to the north korean resort. they will meet their relatives, six separate times over the space of two hours each.
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>> separated for six decades and they will get two hours together. >> everything in the studio stopped when they were telling that story, because everybody had to take a look at it. >> let's turn to nicole mitchell. welcome back. >> yes, thank you, i was off looking at the fall colors last week, they were gorgeous. this is something that was being monitored the entire time. there are actually two systems out here. you can see the second one a little bit better formed now will steer off to satisfactory. the one that's been impacting the philippines, even though it crossed the island, now what it's been doing is a skirting up the side of that northwest side, so it's still causing the rain, even though it's not taking that direct impact anymore. as it does that, it could actually across the northwestern tip. again, it's been losing intensity, so the winds aren't as much. there's still moisture, adding to the flood concerns and then
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slowly heading toward taiwan, although it looks like it will lose intensity at that point. that's one concern. if you look back to the united states, totally the opposite. we're not looking at a lot of mainly. the eastern half of the country is pretty dry. we did have that little bit of snow over the weekend the last couple of days. you can see moisture into the southwest moving up into the rockies, so there could be some hit and miss heavy rains with that. especially as we get into wednesday, two days out from now, look for more of a flow into mexico and texas. that could be a slight concern for us. mostly cool temperatures people are dealing with, so bundle up. >> thank you. >> grief counselors on handled at a texas high school after the death of yet another high school football player. cameron matthews collapsed on the bench after a kick out of return. he was a junior at alto high school. no word yet on the cause of
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death in this case. >> the search is on this morning for a man who opened fire at zombie con in florida, that shooting taking place saturday night as the crowds gathered for the annual event. one man was killed, five injured. the town's mayor called it a senseless act of violence. >> a budget crise in illinois its taking a toll across the state. there's been no official state budget for months. programs relying on state funding could shut down, that includes one crime fighting program in chicago that targets gun violence. we explain. >> this is the auburn neighborhood on chicago's south side. it lost its ceasefire program back in march. so far this year, there have been about 130 shootings in this neighborhood. that's about a 30 more than last year. there's also been recently a string of armed robberies. now the director of the ceasefire program here thinks there's definitely a connection between the loss of ceasefire and the increase in violence
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crime here. >> we have evidence that when ceasefire is up and running and communities throughout the state of illinois, crime and shootings in our communities that we're in, unfortunately, we're not in all of the communities, but the small number of communities that ceasefire's working in, we do an excellent job in bringing down the violence and shootings in our community. >> tonight, how some ceasefire programs here in the city are surviving, thanks to private donations. al jazeera, chicago. >> diane takes a deeper look at the struggles to keep that ceasefire alive this evening on aljazeera america. >> honoring eddie murphy. >> he gets a prestigious award and does something he hasn't done in almost three decades.
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playing with fire. this fire is dangerous for both our people. >> stay with al jazeera for continuing coverage.
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>> a terrifying fall for this
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b.m.x. biker down a cliff side. that didn't stop the rider. the 19-year-old skidded down the path, fell off the cliff. medics rushed over to treat him. he has not been seriously injured. he got up and finished the race. even did a back flip after that. >> wow. >> president obama will be welcoming a special guest at the white house today as part of the administration's strong my night event. one of the you have students invited to star gaze with the president is the texas high school student who was arrested for bringing a homemade clock to school. some teachers said they were concerned the device might be a bomb. he served a three day suspension in the case, igniting a discussion over islamaphobia and racial profiling. >> saying goodbye to an iconic toy store. the store is the latest victim of urban development.
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>> it's the place everyone in beijing knows to go to for their cheap toys, the toys have become more sophisticated over the years, but sold the same way, stacked high and going cheap. >> i come here often and the prices good. i never thought it would close down. >> i have been coming here since i was a teenager. i almost grew up here. >> on this stall, things are going even cheaper with the clausure just days away. >> things that don't sell off, i put in the warehouse and open new space. >> he is philosophical about the closure. >> some place is upgraded, more professional. >> the rapid development means constant change for people, from the places they live and work to
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travel between the two. now it seems how they can shop is undergoing a transformation. >> or an increasingly smart and modern capital city, the authorities want the sleek malls to match. ironically for these store holders, their last day of business and the death of their market will come on halloween. rob mcbride, al jazeera, beijing. >> a big honor for eddie murphy, awarded the mark twain prize, the nation's top prize for humor. fellow comedies were on hand. >> there was also some confusion about whether or not it was an award or a prize. i, you know, actually, it's an award, even though they call it the prize, it's an award. usually when there's a prize, there's money involved. >> murphy told a profane joke
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about bill cosby, his first groks on stage in 28 years. comedians told murphy he's the reason they got into comedy. he became the most commercial successful african-american author. one of the first movies i saw was beverly hills cop. terrific honor. >> ahead, searching for clarity, secretary of state john kerry asking israel to clearly state a position on holy sites in jerusalem, tensions flaring over rumors that israel wants to make changes. >> stuck in the cold and rain, thousands are stranded on european borders as nation's disagree over how many people to accept. we'll be right back with more news. >> that's right. >> we have 300,000 kids that are in collapse prone schools. >> the tsunami, it's gonna move faster than you can run... usain bolt won't be able to out run it. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us.
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>> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity.
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>> polls are open in canada where voters are choosing their next government. the results could affect the international debate over climate change and what muslim women are allowed to wear.
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>> a license to fly, the federal government expected to crack down on drones by requiring owners to register their devices. >> welcome to your world this morning. >> secretary of state john kerry calling on israel and the palestinians to end that violence that has been raging now for weeks, that violence leaving nine israelis and 43 palestinians dead. overnight, kerry urging both sides to clarify their stance on the disputed al aqsa mosque compound. >> an investigation into the death of an asylum seeker shot. officials say they thought he was involved in a shooting attack at the city's bus station. the actual shooter was also killed, along with an israel soldier. >> live this morning in jerusalem, and what more do we
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know about the attack and how are israeliles reacting this morning? what we're hearing from the police is that an israeli palestinian man burst into the bus station in southern israel shortly after dark, seized a rifle from a soldier and began opening fire. police say nine people were injured, four police officers, the other civilians. one israeli soldier was killed. at that point, the attacker was shot dead. there was another man who security guards in the bus station suspected of being the second attacker. this was a 26-year-old ai eritrn ref fee. people started to kick and beat
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him, believing that he was the second attacker. he later died of his injuries in hospital. that has led to an israel police investigation. they said they want to catch the people who killed him and they are urging civilians not to take the law into their own hands, because that is one of the problems here now, because of the random low tech nature of these attacks, there is an immense paranoia and suspicion, so it only takes a trigger and then everybody is pumped up and they're also looking to see how they can step in. >> last week, they said you might want to secure a weapon. what is the latest on the ground in jerusalem this morning, even as we speak? >> well, it's interesting you say that. i was thinking exactly the same thing. it was only last week that i was talking to the jerusalem mayor on the streets of jerusalem, and he was urging israel civilians
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to carry weapons. i said does that not open the way to revenge attacks? he said well, we're all very well trained. well, they may be well trained in the us of a weapon, but with this kind of split decision making and more guns on the street, that does make a complicate environment. it is certainly complicated in jerusalem this morning. there are more barricades, more concrete blocks going up around neighborhoods in occupied east jerusalem to try and stop palestinians coming across into other parts of the city. i was just down there this morning in the neighborhood talking to a family there. part of the family grew up and was born in new york, and one of the women from that family, a 65-year-old died overnight. the family say that she inhaled tear gas and then had a breathing attack, and so the sons tried to take her to hospital, which is just a five minute drive away and say that they weren't allowed through an israel checkpoint.
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i'm still trying to get the details of their version of the events from the israeli police. from the family reports, the woman died there at the checkpoints. the family say her last words to her sons were i can't breathe. what does that make us think of. the family is saying this cannot be happening to civilians, they cannot ring in and imprison civilians just because of what is going on. >> in the meantime, secretary of state john kerry discussing or talking about the situation from spain. >> no, we are not seeking some new change. we are not seeking outsiders or others to come in. i don't think israel wants that, i don't think king abdullah and jordan want that and we are not proposing it. >> the secretary plans to meet and talk with both the palestinian and israeli leaders. what can we expect and why are we having this clarification if benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister of israel says that
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there have been no changes? >> >> well, that is certainly the israeli narrative. what the palestinian leadership believe is that progressively, the israeli government is changing access rights and restrictions to the al aqsa mosque to allow the jews to visit their more and possibly even in the future pray there. it is a very symbolic trigger point. as far these talks this week go, well, the israelis say that the americans do have a vested interest in trying to ensure that israel doesn't become another mideast flashpoint. the u.s. has already got its handles full with the war in syria and also with the growing influence of iran in the region, what the palestinian leadership are telling me is that they no longer consider the united states is an honest broke herb in this pros. they say that the united states is one of israel's staunchest political and military allies.
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they feel of course the united states always comes down on the side of israel. there's an additional factor in this. yesterday the palestinian leadership said to me we don't believe that we can even control the young people on the streets anymore. they are pushing for much deeper solutions to end the israeli occupation, del. >> carl, thank you very much. >> secretary of state john kerry did discuss syria during his trip to spain. he said washington wants to avoid a total destruction of the country. >> everybody, including the russians and the iranians have all said there is no military solution, so we need to get about the effort of finding the political solution. >> kerry will meet this week with counterparts prom russia, turkey, saudi arabia to explore political options for syria. >> the pentagon saying a senior al-qaeda commander has been killed in syria.
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al nasr was killed by a u.s. drone strike in northwest syria. he was the top finance officer. he had been a leader also in the khorasan group working in syria. >> turkish officials are concerned they could see a rising number of refugees as russia ramps up military assaults in syria. syrian pro-government forces backed by russian airstrikes expanded their ground too much to the strategic city of aleppo. thousands of residents have fled in recent days. the town is 30 miles from the turkish border. more than 2 million refugees, mostly syrian are already in turkey. >> in croatia, refugees there struggling to cross the border as police try to stop them from doing so. more than 6,000 people reached croatia over the weekend. officials say the refugee camps are overcrowded and can't take anymore people. al jazeera has the very latest. >> in the dark of night and the rain, they walk west. they're final destination
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unknown, most are from syria escaping war, all trying to find refuge in europe. >> in may be 10 days, we would have 35,000 migrants in slovenia, which is unacceptable for us. >> in this no man's land, police fire shots in the air. >> i understand you. >> officers tell them to wait behind barbed wire fences. croatia says more than 200,000 people have arrived from serbia in the last month. hungary and several other former communist states have already closed their borders. >> we are seeing that winter is here, and the numbers haven't gone down, so more desperate people on the move, the winter is going to add to their suffering. >> bundled up in plastic, tarps, blankets, they brave the cold. on foot and in trains, they continue tackling one obstacle, one hurdle at a time.
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>> take everybody, money, mobile, every time arrest and take everything. >> from serbia to croatia, thousands have arrived in slovenia, the government will accept a few thousand a day. >> croatia asked us to process 5,000 migrants per day and of course on the other hand, we have a request from austria rewarding their situation and capacity which says they cannot possibly accept more than 1,500. >> observers say that limit means people will get stuck in croatia. germany is expecting at least 1 million asylum seekers this year, but making it to these countries does not guarantee these refugees will be able to start believe their new lives. al jazeera. >> a cleanup is underway in the philippines after typhoon kappu
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stormed through the region. >> let's turn to nicole mitchell. where is this storm headed? >> the problem is it is still grazing the coast of the philippines, they're still getting the moisture adding to the flooding concern. you can see this near the island. it has lost intensity, not looking at organized now, but it is grazing that kind of western coastline. as it does that, it could actually kind of reclip the coastline on the northwest side and eventually move towards taiwan. it is at the minimum category of typhoon right now. it is likely this will be downgraded to a tropical storm in the near future, but still causing problems. >> the weather we have seen moving through the great lakes into the mid atlantic with the cold brought know along with it. here's the video out of michigan as it moves through that area. lovely images, people sang it's too early in the season, especially since we were all out
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trying to see the leaves. syracuse got around nine-inch little of snow. that's where i was last week, trying to see all the leaves. i couldn't make it to the top of mount washington, a great weather observatory, which is of course why i wanted to go, because the weather closed that road up to the top. with the cold air behind that system, we have front of the and freeze in effect, all the way down to parts of alabama this morning. i've seen some temperatures below freezing. we're getting the sun out, so kind of bottomed out in those temperatures, but definitely cooler still, 30's and 40's, and for today, the cooler temperatures before some of the mid atlantic will rebound into the 70's, but a cool day. in the meantime, the midsection of the country has already gotten under a ridge of high pressure with that warmer air, so a lot of 70's today and still dry and warm. we actually have red flag warnings in effect for central pores of the united states. there's a real contrast this morning. >> i feel bad when i can't reach
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the beach on vacation. >> and i want to hit mount washington and weather observatory, yeah. >> crews working to clear a mudslide in antelope valley in california. it is closed after rains drenched that region last week. the mud throw reached as high as six feet, a handful of cars still stuck in the mess. >> the university of mississippi is expected to vote on whether to remove the state flag from campus. the mississippi flagg has a confederate symbol on it. administrators have been called on to take it down. about a dozen confederate flag supporters showed up on friday. at least three other state universities don't fly that very same flag. >> today, the transportation department is expected to announce a new push to regulate drones. they are port of a more than $4 million industry. >> the devices have been involved in dangerous incidents in recent months. we have more. good morning. >> good morning.
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the federal aviation administration gets about 100 reports every month from drone sitings. these rules would require everyone who buys to drone to register it so the government knows who is flying them and where. >> a government task force is expected to start meeting within weeks to draw up rules requiring every new drone to be registered with the government. that is in responsibility to a booming drone market and some dangerous encounters. in august, two planes at new york's j.f.k. airport came within 100 feet of a drone. earlier this year, a drone similar to this model, about two feet in diameter went down ocean of the white house. >> it does serve as a very powerful reminder, right on the white house doorstep that drones can be used in ways that can affect our national security, as well. >> the devices sophisticated with onboard computers and g.p.s. technology and becoming increasingly important in industries. >> they are used by business, by
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agriculture, farmers use them to see if their cows escaped the ranch. >> drones can be equipped with cameras to weapons. last month, new york senator charles schumer proposed requiring every drone to include what's called geofencing, coding that can limit where the drones can fly. >> the geofencing would say we're not allowed to fly within two miles of an airport, above .500 feet, over the f.b.i. headquarters, over a parade. that would solve the problem. >> at least 45 states are now considering their own drone regulation bills. >> an estimated 500,000 drones are in the air lard. regulations could be in place by the end of the year. >> it's become big business globally. what about people who already own drones. >> one person says that's precisely one of the many things the task force will be looking at. what will happen to the owner
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who have drones in the air. they are unclear. >> they are interesting. >> the u.s. starts the process of lifting sanctions on iran. >> as tehran promises to make good on its promise to cut back on its nuclear program p.m. we'll talk to a former weapons inspector to see if that's actually happening. >> sluggish growth for the worlded second largest economy. what's leading to the big slowdown in china.
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>> egyptian are voting today. as it is the country's first parliamentary election since 2013 when president mohamed morsi was overthrown, the government declaring a half day off for people to get out to
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vote, but as al jazeera explains, enthusiasm and turnout are low. >> this is the second time egyptians are voting for a parliament since the 2011 protest that removed president hosni mubarek. unlike the first elections, turnout from sunday, according to local media was extremely low. the last time a parliamentary poll took place, this was the scene, people queuing for hours waiting to cast their ballot. that was the first free and fair election in egypt's history. the victors were the muslim brotherhood party, but now as a result of the 2013 coup, the brotherhood's leaders are killed, jailed or exiled and the movement outlawed. it's not only the brotherhood absent. several other parties, including the april 6 youth movement and others have boycotted the vote in protest as what they say is the continued oppression under
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president al sisi. it's a view echoed by many. >> no, i won't vote. young people once were passionate about voting. we voted in the parliamentary elections and the presidential election after mubarak's resignation, but the passion died down after mohamed morsi was removed from his presidency. few young people voled in al sisi's presidential election and even they resented doing it. >> supporters have justified the crackdown saying the country needed to sacrifice freedoms for the economy. the economy remains in decline. >> we egyptians have not held any improvement in people's livelihoods since 2013. we are still faced with economic crisis and we have high
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unemployment. >> although there are numerous candidates vying for a seat in parliament, there's little between them in terms of political diversity. sunday ballot papers didn't include opponents of president sisi or egypt's military leaders. sisi had hoped that the parliament would appease those who continue to criticize him for lack of freedom in egypt. if the turnout remains low, many may still question the future parliament's credibility. al jazeera. >> the nuclear deal with iran is now officially in effect, adoption day was sunday and tehran pledging to begin dismantling parts of its nuclear program in coming days. diplomatic low mats are in vienna to work out implement. >>. germany sees sanctions in tehran in place until at least january. among the things tehran must do is remove thousands of centrifuges from facilities. it must also slash uranium
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stockpiles by 98%. it has to pour concrete into the reactor core of its plutonium processing plant. a former u.s. weapons inspector in iraq penned the report on sadaam hussein's program after the invasion in 2003. you wrote in politico last month that you give the iran deal a less than 50% chance of success. how crucial is this first phase in knowing whether iran intends to live up to its side of the bargain? >> well, i say so far, so good. i said 50% chance of success over the full duration of the term, but these important days are very important. as you saw perhaps in the iranian review, their legislation was cantankerous period. it wasn't a sure thing that the adoption day would go forward, but it has. the next step i think to keep an eye on will be december 15 when
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we see first reports from the i.a.e.a. >> i want to get back to the september 15 deadline. first i want to talk about inspections and the importance of that. how much can we trust the iaea inspection results? can they be taken at face value? >> they have been forceful with regard to their work in iran. inspections having going on for quite a while and there have been periods where iran has had to comply with the initial demands from the p5 plus one, so far they have been complying. they are going to be very, very attentive and have to expand their work considerably. i believe the i.a.e.a. is going to hire 100 new inspectors to cover all the areas in iran. >> you sound confident. based on your writings where you had anytime, anywhere inspections, sadaam hussein's regime was still able to get around some of them, correct?
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>> that's absolutely correct. this is a completely different kettle of fish. what they're focusing on here is the nuclear supply route. i suspect that they'll be able to monitor that fairly well, but there are other elements of a nuclear program, the so-called weaponization activity, the ballistic missiles, things you need to do to build a nuclear explosive and then deliver it. those times of things are going to be difficult to monitor. >> let's talk about that. how concerned should the obama administration be that just a few weeks ago iran activitied a long-range missile and in your opinion, did it vital this deal? >> president radio ha rouhani ge indication that he was going to ignore those elements that are in u.n. resolutions as opposed to in this jointly nuclear agreement with the p5 plus one, and specifically he was addressing his domestic audience who was very interested in doing the ballistic missile work.
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he's being true to his word that he is going to do strict compliance with the nuclear elements. >> does it mean that they are start to go already whittle away at this deal? >> i think we're getting an early indication that they're going to be pretty careful on the edges. they are not going to be overly expansive in what they comply with. i think as time goes on and sanctions are in fact relieved, then the question becomes much more broad on how compliant they will be. >> quick question before i let you go. if iran does take iraq off line as planned in this first face, the reactor to produces blue tone yep and ships out highly enriched uranium, how quickly could they reverse that? >> the reactor worse on the plutonium side of the equation. you can have plutonium or uranium. taking off that one reactor is very important, but the taking
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off the line of the other centrifuges is also important. this will play out over the next several months and we'll get an idea in december how good the ia e-waste is going to be and how good iran is going to be. >> thank you for your time. >> thank you. >> china's economy is showing weakness with economic growth at a six year low. the world's second largest economy growing 6.9% last quarter, that is the slowest growth since 2009 and that is down from 7% the prior year. asian economist says the slump will affect the rest of the world. >> given what we've been seeing in the slowdown and the real estate sector in terms of the heavy industry, in terms of what it means, well, i think what it's really showing is that the economy is slowing, but it's not slowing as dramatically as what some people may be thinking. we've got like a two speed economy going. in terms for the rest of the
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world, the fact that we're seeing the real estate sector flow, this is actually bad news for the rest of the world. >> last quarter slow down in china would have been worse if not for a rise in consumer spending over the summer. >> hillary clinton versus the congressional republicans investigating the benghazi attack. >> she gets ready to go to capitol hill to testify, the head of the committee has proof to clinton's staff ignored security threats. >> canadians head to the polls to choose their new parliament. why muslim women have become a key issue in the race.
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>> when i met daisy, it was the best day of my life. when my past caught up with me and made us all pay the price. >> the social worker said, "i'm
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gonna have to take the baby". they took my family. i don't know how i'm gonna do it but... i need another lawyer. you're gonna have to kill me to take my child. >> taking a live look at the port aa dell sol. >> it is 8:30 eastern time. >> secretary of state john kerry is returning to washington now to prepare for meetings with the leaders of israel and the palestinian authority. speaking from spain a few hours ago, he called on both sides to clarify their stance on the al aqsa compound, a holy site for muslims and jews to try to ease tensions. >> this morning at least 14 are
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dead, 60,000 people out of their homes in the philippines after typhoon kappu went through the region. >> iran pledged to begin making major changes to facilities and cooperate, u.n. inspections. the sanctions won't be lifted until iran complies. >> politics on the campaign trail this week, national security taking center stage. hillary clinton is making her way to capitol hill to face the house benghazi committee. >> on the republican side, donald trump and jeb bush trading jacks over the september 11 attacks, trump wen after foer president george w. bush, jeb's brother, over the attacks. al jazeera's paul beban has more. >> an thursday, former secretary of state and democratic front runner hillary clinton testifies
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before the house select committee on benghazi, almost a year and a half after of the committee came into existence in may of 2014. as the committee's calendar turns towards the main event, republicans playing defense over accusations that the investigation is nothing more than a political witchhunt. >> she's an important witness, but she is one witness, and by the time we're through, john, we will have interviewed 70 witnesses, so she's one of out of the 70. >> democrats, including the committee's top democratic, say the real mission isn't digging up the truth, it's really about damming hillary clinton. >> we literally a year ago had a plan that mr. gaudy presented to us where we would have interviewing these key people. he through that away and went straight after hillary clinton. >> clinton herself cited comments by kevin mccarthy that
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the committee had chipped away at her standing in the polls. >> i think it's pretty clear that whatever they might have thought they were doing, they ended up becoming a partisan arm of the republican national committee with an overwhelming focus on trying to, as they admitted, drive down my poll numbers. >> the benghazi inquiry eventually led to revelations about clinton's private email system, something even rival bernie sanders says should be put to rest. sanders said he had no second thoughts about the comment and quickly changed the subject. the american people want a discussion in this country of the real issues. >> meanwhile, gop front runner donald trump defended his commits about president george w. bush and 9/11, questioning jeb bush's credibility and saying that because he's tough on immigration, 9/11 wouldn't have happened on a president trump's watch. >> jeb said we were safe with my brother, we were safe.
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well, the world trade center just fell down. i believe that if i were running things, i doubt that those people would have been in the country. >> for his part, jeb bush couldn't resist firing back. >> it just calls into question mr. trump's credibility as a commander-in-chief and architect of the next generation foreign policy. >> ben carson stumbled over a question about foreign policy, offering a confusing explanation of how if the u.s. had declared energy independence, there wouldn't have been a war in afghanistan. >> i personally don't believe that invading iraq was an existential threat to us. i don't think sadaam hussein was an existential threat. >> i wasn't asking about invading iraq, i was asking about invading afghanistan, which had been harboring osama bin laden. >> i was primarily talking about iraq.
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i wasn't particularly interested in going into afghanistan. >> critics saying donald trump is trying to shift the blame with his questions over how september 11 was handled under the bush administration. we talked about it last hour. >> hillary clinton might be blamed for not dealing with benghazi quickly enough, not responding to the alerts that she got, and you can make an argument that george w. bush got some signals that there was an eminent attack. that argument was made. there were congressional hearings about it. that's not what trump is saying. he's saying it happened on his watch, therefore he's to blame, just like benghazi happened on hillary clinton's watch therefore she's to blame. it's not a very sophisticated argument. it's trying to pin something on someone else. it sounds like a bugging procedure touch is doing and republicans are looking to someone who can stand up to the
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bully. >> snyder saying it is unlikely the senate hearings on the benghazi attacks will ever likely lead to any charges against hillary clinton. >> a federal judge is expected to decide whether louisiana governor can stop funding for planned parenthood. he's been trying for months. it is connected to secretly recorded videos showing planned parenthood workers talking about handling feet tall tissue without court intervention, state funding will end next week. >> canadians are going to the polls. one of the big issues facing them is over what some canadian women can wear. al jazeera's john terrett reports. >> a gathering last week at the university of toronto called looking past the piece of clothing that covers the face of some muslim women around the
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world. the meeting is in response to what some consider anti muslim rhetoric. >> we have the same fierce, we have the same happy insists, we are all the same. there is a push to have women who wear the knee cob to unveil their faces to be sworn in. >> plus limb leaders say it has led to three attacks. the number of religious based violent attacks doubled in 2014. there are even more already this year. >> i met up with ahia near her home. she was willing to show her face privately to the judge before
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swearing her oath publicly with everyone else. she said wearing a niqab has never been an issue until now. >> the canadian community is very polite, but still i have noticed that they do look a little bit more strangely towards me. >> prime minister stephan harper called the wearing of the niqab uncanadians what do you uncanadian. what do you say for that? >> i've been wearing it for a long time, though i didn't always wear it. i feel very liberate and feel it's not necessary for me to show my face to communicate. >> the policy was ruled as a violation of their right. >> that policy is not law, yet the minister purported to create a policy that trumped the law or in effect attempted to rule by decree. >> sara daniel is not comfortable anymore in her home country. she arrived in glasgow as a baby and said she has never been more afraid to wear a hijab in public.
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>> today harper is focusing on the niqab. tomorrow, it might be my . hijab or something else. i kind of jokingly said well one day, maybe we'll all have to come in our birthday suit. >> the bump in polls harper got after the comment dissipated, but canadians have called him out on it. >> our prime minister, despite his attempts to make it a wedge issue has failed to do so. canadians are not racist people. canadians know better. they have a greater expectation of their government. >> if he wins, he is talking about banning niqabs for public employees. john terrett, al jazeera, toronto. >> grief counselors are on hand
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at a texas high school after the death of yet another high school football player. cameron matthews collapsed after a kickoff return. he was a junior at alto high school. he is now the sixth high school football player to die this season alone. no word yet on the cause of his death. >> the search is on this morning for a man who opened fire at zombie com in florida. police in fort myers said the shooting took place as crowds gathered for the annual festival. one was killed, five injured. the town's mayor condemned the attack, calling it a senseless act of violence. >> a budget crisis in illinois is taking its toll across the state. there's been no official state budget for months. that means programs relying on state funding could shut down, including one crime fighting program in chicago that targets gun violence. >> this is the auburn neighborhood on chicago's south side. it lost its ceasefire program
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back in march. so far this year, there have been about 130 shootings in this neighborhood. that's about a third more than last year. there's also been recently a string of armed robberies. now the director of the ceasefire program here thinks there's definitely a connection between the loss of ceasefire and the increase in violent crime here. >> we have evidence that when ceasefire is up and running and communities throughout the state of illinois, crime and shootings in our communities that we're in, unfortunately, we're not in all of the communities, but the small number of communities that ceasefire's working in, we do an excellent job in bringing down the violence and shootings in our community. >> tonight, i'll tell you how some ceasefire programs here in the city are surviving, thanks to private donations. al jazeera, chicago. >> ceasefire programs that have received private funding are seeing a drop in crime in some areas. more on that story at
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8:00 eastern here on aljazeera america. there have been 2300 shootings so far this year. >> fascinating that they say this is a program that is working. >> french police now searching volkswagen's offices there, part of that investigation into the cheating on emissions test. they are looking for documents connected with the scandal. jokes wagon said 11 million diesel cars around the world affected, including 1 million in france alone. >> excitement and anxiety in north and south korea this morning as people from both sides of the border meet relatives they have not seen in years. family reunions are on tuesday, part of an agreement between two countries to try to reduce tensions. it is only the second such reunion in five years. >> this is the hotel lobby where
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the 4.000 family members have been contacted by the north korean side that their relatives had been seeking this reunion have been registering for that reunion. it's been a room full of incredible individual stories, personalized, changed forever by the huge impersonal forces of history. among those stories, i'll share one of them with you, the story of this 84-year-old. she was married for seven months. she was three months pregnant when her husband went missing. he was part of the south korean military. he went off on military training but in the confusion of the war never came home. she assumed that he died, paid tribute to him ever since. she looked after his parents, raised the son who was still unborn at the time of his disappearance. she's kept with her all that time a pair of his old shoes,
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saying essentially that her whole life was contained in those shoes, the absence of that man. she's brought with her her now 64-year-old son. he's talking about being able to embrace both of his parents for the first time, the sense of pride that he had finally finding out that he had a father. when you hear an old man talking in those sorts of terms of almost a young boy, you get the sense of the emotional power that's around this place at the moment. it all gets way on tuesday when they travel to the north korean resort. they will meet their relatives, six separate times over the space of two hours each. that will be it, they will come back to south korea. >> despite separated for six decades, those reunion families tomorrow, those reunited families will have two hours to interact with each other. >> the latest agreement between colombia and its largest rebel movement may bring closure for thousands of families. the government and farc rebels agreed to search for people missing now in five decades of war. tens of thousands of people have never been found or accounted for in the battle between farc and the government forces.
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>> afghanistan's economy is sliding, as that nation battles that resurgent taliban threat. >> many troops are worried about the people's economic future.
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>> i've been asked to keep my voice down
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>> many stores were destroyed in the fighting. >> we've lost about $20,000 in the shop without counting destruction of the building. we want the government to guarantee protection for people's lives and investment so people can come back, invest and live their lives. >> the people of kunduz don't have faith in the so-called national unity government of president ashraf began knee and abdullah, abdullah, two rivals now ruling together. >> the situation is good now, but we don't trust these two presidents or the chief executive. we are afraid if we borrow money
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and invest, we don't trust that the fighting won't happen again. >> that means some shops remain closed. many were looted in the fighting. they are struggling to open without enough supplies. >> >> now they won't even give you $200, that's all because of fighting. >> the city's biggest hotel hasn't had a reservation since the fighting stopped. outside, women waited for handouts, a new ritual here. many don't have money for food. >> the economic effects of the fall of kunduz are felt here in kabul, as well. this is a city where the appliance market is way down. this washington is worth $650, it is on sale for $200. there are no buyers. >> muhammed said his business dropped 80%. people save their money in case security gets worse.
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they are buying only what he needs, no luxuries. he is not buying much, either. >> the fighting sent a message to shop keepers do not invest in reconstructing the shops. today kunduz, tomorrow it could be kabul. >> shop keepers are not making enough to pay their rent. they are worried about crime. thieves stole a few hundred dollars and bookkeeping equipment. his business lost $7,000 in the past seven months. if the economy doesn't get better, he will consider leaving afghanistan altogether. >> pakistan's prime minister will be in washington this week for a meeting with president obama. they are expected to speak about limiting the pakistani nuclear program and the two may also talk about the situation in afghanistan. pakistani media say officials there are livid over allegations that islamabad could be connected to the u.s. bombing of
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a hospital in kunduz. christine fair said president obama has failed when it comes to the u.s. relationship with pakistan. >> the way the united states has chosen to in tent vice pakistan has been through handouts. there's been no punishment. pakistan is dedicated to maintaining an islamist militant presence in afghanistan and the united states cannot find any way of making pakistan change its behavior simply by paying them. this is something that the united states has done repeatedly, with absolutely the same outcome, which is pakistan continues to support the insurgents. i think there's another grim reality, is that that $33 billion that we've given pakistan since 2001 has gone in some measure or another to subsidize pakistan's growing military arsenal.
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the united states gets an f. in managing its pakistan relationship. >> in her nationals, pakistan is not interested in helping secure afghanistan and accuses the pakistani government of undermining the government in kabul for more than a decade. >> iraq forces on the offensive trying to retake anbar from isil. isil fighters there killing 120 iraqi soldiers over the past two days of intense fighting, 40 soldiers dying in a suicide bombing attack near ramadi on sunday. there are also reports to 100 isil fighters were carried by security forces in a battle for control over the province. >> a hearing could restart the military trials for five prisoners. the judge stopped the proceedings last spring when a defense attorney revealed the f.b.i. had questioned his team about a potential security breach. the justice department now says no one from that legal team will face criminal charges. >> still ahead, a chinese toy store falling victim to the times.
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>> urban expansion is taking its toll on china's small businesses.
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>> we have an update on a story we reported just a few minutes ago. a federal judge this morning in louisiana now ordering that state to continue funding planned parenthood for 14 more days. louisiana's govern bobby jindal has been trying to cut the funding following secretly
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recording video showing planned parenthood workers talking about feet tall tissue. >> china will be saying goodbye to an electronic store at the end of the month, a victim of urban redevelopment. rob mcbride explains. >> it's the place everyone in beijing knows to go to for their cheap toys, the toys have become more sophisticated over the years, but sold the same way, stacked high and going cheap. >> i come here often and the prices are good. i never thought it would close down. >> i have been coming here since i was a teenager. i almost grew up here. >> on this stall, things are going even cheaper with the closure just days away.
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>> things that don't sell off, i put in the warehouse and open new space. >> he is philosophical about the closure. >> some place is upgraded, more professional. >> the rapid development means constant change for people, from the places they live and work to travel between the two. now it seems how they can shop is undergoing a transformation. >> for an increasingly smart and modern capital city, it appears the authorities want the sleek malls to match. ironically for these stall holders, their last day of business and the death of their market will come on halloween. rob mcbride, al jazeera, beijing. >> president obama will welcome a special guest to the white house today, ahmed muhammed is invited to strong my night. he is the texas high school student arrested, accused of bringing a homemade clock to school. teachers said they were concerned that it might be a
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bomb. it wound up being just a science fair project that he was very proud of. >> a big honor for eddie murphy, awarded top prize for humor. fellow comedians were on hand last night to pay tribute. >> usually when it's a prize, there's money involved. >> they were his first jokes on stage in 28 years. some comedian told murphy he was the reason they got into comedy. he went on to also become the most commercially successful african-american actor in film history. i haven't watched the whole video, but tracy morgan gave a very moving speech. he said he was a comedic hero.
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of course tracy morgan was in that terrible accident. he said he wouldn't have gotten into the business without murphy. murphy called him after that tragic accident and made him laugh. >> he explained that he wouldn't joke about cosby in the past because he did not think the timing was right. >> a well deserved honor, in my opinion. >> a grainy black and white photo is linked to the titanic being auctioned off this week. the iceberg is said to be the same one that sank the titanic in 1912. it was taken from a ship hours after the titanic went down. the red paint could be seen on the iceberg. that may have scraped off the titanic during the collision. >> fascinating. >> coming up in our next hour from doha, more from the croatian border where thousands stranded, still can't get where they want to go on their desperate journey. >> we are back tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. eastern. have a great monday morning.
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>> welcome to the news hour live from doha. coming up in the next 60 minutes, turkey rebuffs e.u. aid offer for refugees. the prime minister said his country is not a concentration camp. >> hundreds of refugees stuck in the cold and rain in serbia as the balkans struggles with the growing backlog. >> an

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